CSS

Forms, reports and charts created using a powerful WYSIWYG visual editor

A new interesting tool which allows forms, reports and charts to be created using a powerful WYSIWYG visual editor was developed atop the Visual WebGui .NET AJAX platform.

The tool is an automated environment (IDE) for developing web systems using the methodology DDD (Domain-Driven Development). Automato allows the creation of complex systems like ERP and CRM on a powerful Web applications platform for using the same concepts of desktop applications. This model maximizes the interactivity with the end-user and makes the systems more robust.

Unlike the current models of creating Web applications that require prior knowledge of various technologies (DHTML, JavaScript, CSS, etc.), creating rich interface applications (RIA) in Automato™ are automatically managed by a powerful platform which provides a harmonic development experience using a single technology. This dramatically reduces the time of creation, costs and learning curve.

Features Integrated :

1. Powerful Form Editor (WYSIWYG).
2. Multiple Database Support
3. Modeling Database from E/R Diagrams
4. Compare & Merge Databases Model
5. Unique Compare and Merge Applications
6. Source Control Management
7. Issue Tracking System / Project Management System

Learn about Automato...

New Web design tool & Themes

The new Point & Click web design tool - the Control & Theme Designer - presents a ground breaking simple, intuitive developer/designer interface to creating advanced, customized, and creative customer-facing Web user interfaces (UIs) without any need to code in HTML and CSS.
The new tool will allow to easily create custom themes for Visual WebGui applications or download complete themes. New themes created by Gizmox that would give your Visual WebGui application familiar, cool looks are going to be available for download. Here are some examples of the themes that you should expect to see when 6.4 Preview is released demonstrated by screenshots of the same control with a different theme each time.
Mac Theme:
dialogbox with Mac Theme

Google Analytics Theme:
Google Analytics Theme
dialogbox with Google Analytics Theme
 
Gmail Theme:
Gmail Theme
dialogbox with Gmail Theme

Facebook Theme:
Facebook Theme
dialogbox with Facebook Theme

Vista Theme:
Vista Theme
dialogbox with Vista Theme

XP Theme:
XP Theme
dialogbox with XP Theme
Black Theme:
Black Theme

You can also get more information through the following resources:

 

Designing custom controls with the innovative visual Web design tools

The visual Control & Theme Designer web design tools introduced in version Visual WebGui 6.4 version allows to create cool new designs and themes and also custom controls. The new 'how to' tutorial shows how simple it is to create a Visual WebGui custom control with the new designer tool.

This 'How to' is divided into two parts whereas the first part demonstrates the creation of the programmatic part of the water mark text box control and the second part shows how to add the design time of the control.

View the full tutorial here:
Design Visual WebGui custom controls with the new Control & Theme Designer

Cutting-edge Web UI design patterns with no HTML/CSS

This is a first tutorial of the new, cutting-edge Theme & Control designer offered as a preview in the upcoming version of the Visual WebGui RIA development & deployment platform.

The Theme & Control designer enables developers and designers to create or edit controls and to make custom themes in the simplest most efficient way. The Theme & Control designer consolidates all the resources that build up the control into one place and allows to visually manage, edit and custom the design of the UI using point & click and without having to write HTML/CSS code.

View the Basic usage of the new Visual WebGui Theme & Control designer tutorial and learn how to edit images that make up a standard button and quickly transform it to Mac styled buttom.

Sneak Peek video of Visual WebGui 6.4 with Theme & Control Designer

Visual WebGui released a short video as a sneak peek of the new version and its major new features - the Theme & Control Designers although a preview version of Visual WebGui Rich Internet Applications Platform version 6.4 will become available in a couple of weeks.

The new designers which will be available with the upcoming 6.4 Preview version enable simple and quick customization of controls and themes thus enabling developers/designers to create rich, branded, and engaging customer-facing UI's.

Click here to watch the Theme Customization with the new Designer.

Visual WebGui RIA Platform 6.4 Preview to be released soon

Gizmox announced that Visual WebGui RIA & Cloud Platform version 6.4 will be released as a preview version in the beginning of May.

Since 6.4 includes many major, all-new features Gizmox decided to release it as a free Express Studio Preview version first, allowing Visual WebGui developers & community the opportunity to try it as soon as possible and experience its remarkable potential and value.

In the meantime, 6.3.x which is now a stabilized version continues to be offered as a pre-release version. This will also give the devoted Visual WebGui developers community the opportunity to benefit from Visual WebGui's pre-release discount for a bit longer. Gizmox is offering a free upgrade to 6.4 for perpetual licenses and will reset the subscription period to start when the 6.4 version is stabilized and offered commercially.

For those who would like a taste of the next version Gizmox will soon release a free preview of 6.4. Visual WebGui 6.4 discovers a leap forward in Visual WebGui's evolution and it will literally change the way you develop and design Rich Internet Applications. The new version combines the ease of Visual WebGui drag-and-drop application development with graphically-engaging visual designers to build Web UI's. The 6.4 preview brings a new dimension of collaboration between development and UI design tasks enabling simple and productive customization and creation of rich, branded, creative customer-facing Web 2.0 like UI's. This is enabled by new Control & Theme Visual Designers that add up to the Form designer and integrate with existing design software such as Photoshop, Expression Blend, Flash CS, and more to enable the most efficient developer and designer collaboration when customizing and creating new themes and controls. Both Theme and Control Designers provide easy management of the entire project's resources and the integrative capability to edit those resources.

Visual WebGui 6.4 also introduces a new scalability server extension allowing multi-users usage scenarios. The Cluster Server also provides important redundancy to Visual WebGui web applications.

Stay tuned for more information, samples and downloads to be released this month on Visual WebGui News...

Unlimited design & customization capabilities in Visual

I would like to introduce a new development code named “theme designer / control designer”. The new designer simplifies the way to create custom controls and themes in a Visual WebGui application. Up until now, Visual WebGui RIA Platform/Framework provided extreme productivity and simplicity with the out-of-the-box client side behavior / look and feel, but when advanced customization was needed, it called for a different level of development. Since most customers will require customization of various aspects of the UI, we have decided to work on creating a theme designer that would simplify the customization of the UI.

I think I don’t need to elaborate on the business value of customizing the application to be tailored to the customer's needs, and until we provide a rock solid solution for this problem, I personally will not sleep at night…

Gizmox is Introducing the new Visual WebGui control and theme designer

Gizmox CTO Guy Peled posted an announcement about the new Control and Theme Designer expected to be released in the near future in which he describes in details the needs for such tool and the solution that is now being developed. The new designer simplifies the way to create a Custom control and theme to a Visual WebGui application.

Read the Introducing the new Control Designer and Theme Designer... article
on Guy's renewed blog.

Sizzle

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In August of 2008, John Resig started the Sizzle project, a new JavaScript CSS selector engine, with the goal of providing a small (about 4k) and fast core that could be leveraged by jQuery as well as other libraries (such as Dojo, MooTools, etc.). According to Resig, the new library is about 4 times faster than other selector engines in all major browsers. Resig has also been active in courting other framework designers, asking them to adopt Sizzle in their libraries.

While some have many have expressed great excitement at the idea of having a common selector engine, not all are enthusiastic about the idea. Valerio Proietti from the MooTools project has written a blog detailing why he won't be using Sizzle, and even going so far as to say it discourage competition in the JavaScript framework arena.

I’m not saying that John Resig seeks a monopoly over CSS selector engines, but that’s sure what it looks like. Competition and innovation will stop if everyone uses the same piece of code. Yes, competition and innovation[...]

So, if using one shared selector engine is ok, where do we draw the line? Is it ok to use a shared DOM manipulation library, or a shared event library? What makes our framework ours? If we start replacing core parts by outsourcing them to Dojo, our frameworks will just be a dull layer for code we didn’t even write, and we will lose credibility.

While one has to respect Valerio's decision to stick to his own code, I think that he misses some of the potential benefits of having a common selector core across multiple frameworks: elimination of code duplication, consistency of behavior, and robustness (if multiple libraries use a common core, bugs get squashed quicker). After over a decade, JavaScript is finally "growing up" as a language: frameworks like Dojo, Prototype, and jQuery have been a big part of this, allowing developers to get much more done in a much faster time frame than was possible before. It is only natural during this process that common pieces of infra-structure get built to allow framework designers to focus on other things.

If Resig does a great job with Sizzle, why should a new JavaScript library re-invent the wheel? Claiming Resig is somehow seeking a "monopoly" over JavaScript selector engines seems a bit silly and far-fetched. I think the real issue is an (understandable) pride is his own code, and a reluctance to throw it away in favor of someone else's...

Get Started with CSS 3

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While CSS 3 does not yet have full browser support (currently Opera and Safari are leading the way with FireFox said to be adding support in version 3.1) you may want to look into CSS 3 now to get ready for it. Well, over at webmonkey.com they have put together a nice tutorial to get you started.

Below is an excerpt from the post.

Rounded Corners

The number one rule of Web 2.0: If it has rounded corners, it's modern.

Say what you will about the design aesthetics of rounded corners, at least with the new border-radius rules you won't have to resort to images and JavaScript to get that web 2.0 look.

Say you have some HTML that looks like this:

<p class="r-box">Try doing this without images</p>

Add this style definition to round off the element:

.r-box {
	background-color: #666; 
	color: #fff; 
	line-height: 20px; 
	width: 200px; 
	padding: 10px; 
	-webkit-border-radius: 10px; 
	-moz-border-radius: 10px;
}

Here's a live demo for those of you with Firefox or Safari:

Try doing this without images

If you're using a different browser here's a screenshot of how Safari displays the above block:

Image:css3_shot1.jpg



So what did we do? Well the first five lines are your normal CSS 2 declarations to give things a bit of style. It's the last two lines we're interested in. The actual CSS 3 declaration is border-radius. Until the specs are finalized the various browser manufacturers have enabled the features via prefixes -- the -moz- prefix is what Firefox uses and the -webkit- prefix is for Safari.

The rule works like this (where TopLeft, TopRight, etc... is a numeric value in pixels):

border-radius: TopLeft TopRight BottomRight BottomLeft;
border-radius: TopLeft BottomLeft+TopRight BottomRight;
border-radius: TopLeft+BottomRight TopRight+BottomLeft;
border-radius: ALL;

So in our case we used the later rule, but if you want just two rounded corners, you would do this:

-webkit-border-bottom-left-radius: 10px;
-webkit-border-top-right-radius: 10px;
-moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 10px;
-moz-border-radius-topright: 10px;

Note: as of this writing, the W3C is planning to move toward the syntax Mozilla uses, rather than that of Safari. Because the border-radius spec is not finalized, Opera chose not to support it in Opera 9.5.

The nice thing about border-radius is it degrades gracefully. If a browser doesn't understand it, it simply renders a square box.

You can read the full post here.

So, use this tutorial to get prepared for CSS 3 (if IE ever gets their act together) as it will really make your pages look very nice.

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