Ajax

Jump Into Coding

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Jump Into Coding
Over at The Next Web blog they have put together a good resource for people wanting to learn to program. If you want to be a coder, but have no idea where to start this post will be a great help for you. The post discusses how to choose a first programming language and resources to learn about it. The post will be very helpful to anybody new to coding, but even those that code for a living may find a few things that are helpful to learn to program.

Check out the post and let us know what you found useful in the post in the comments below.

You can go to the referenced source of this post here.

Post written by Ajaxonomy using scovry

Game Closure Showing HTML5 Game Frameworks Worth Millions

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Game Closure Showing HTML5 Game Frameworks Worth Millions
Game Closure has created some HTML5 game development tools that are getting a lot of interest. In fact Facebook and Zynga (plus many others) are interested in acquiring the company. With all of this interest in the company they have just been able to to raise $12 million which brings the startup's total of money raised up to just under $13 million.

What makes Game Closure so desirable is how fast their tools make it possible to create HTML5 games for multiple platforms. The tool can take development time form 6 months down to 6 weeks! This makes their JavaScript SDK very useful and I think we will be hearing more from them in the next couple of years.

You can checkout the Game Closure website here.

You can go to the referenced source of this post here.

Post written by Ajaxonomy using scovry

jQuery Dialog Box Tutorial

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Recently on a coding project for my day job I had a requirement to display a dialog box to confirm that when someone clicked a cancel link that they meant to do the cancel action. The dialog box was on a page that built a list of links with multiple cancel links, each with a different url. Since we are using jQuery and since I didn't want a browser dialog box to display I decided to use the jQuery dialog box.

Since I am a firm believer in the first rule of programming (never re-write something that has already been written) I did a quick Google search and found a good example of the jQuery dialog box for when a form is submitted at jensbits.com. The code was close to what I wanted to do, but not exactly. So, I took the code and modified it to work for me.

Below is the portion of the jQuery code that I changed from the code in the jensbits.com post.


$(function(){
// jQuery UI Dialog

$('#dialog').dialog({
autoOpen: false,
width: 400,
modal: true,
resizable: false,
buttons: {
"Yes": function() {
$(this).dialog("close");
$(location).attr('href',$(this).dialog('option', 'anchor'));
return true;
},
"No": function() {
$(this).dialog("close");
return false;
}
}
});

$('.closebutton').click(function(){
$('#dialog').dialog('option', 'anchor', $(this).attr('href'));
$('#dialog').dialog('open');
return false;
});
});

My first modification was to have the dialog open when someone clicks on a link that has a closebutton class assigned to it. I also attached an anchor option to the dialog box that holds the href attribute value of the link.


$('.closebutton').click(function(){
$('#dialog').dialog('option', 'anchor', $(this).attr('href'));
$('#dialog').dialog('open');
return false;
});

The below code shows the setup of the buttons and the major change is that the "Yes" button sets the location attribute to the anchor option value that we set in the code above.


buttons: {
"Yes": function() {
$(this).dialog("close");
$(location).attr('href',$(this).dialog('option', 'anchor'));
return true;
},
"No": function() {
$(this).dialog("close");
return false;
}
}

Below is the code in the body of the html that sets up the links and the dialog box. Notice that each link has the class set to closebutton.


<a id="closebutton1" href="http://ocell.us" class="closebutton">Close</a><br />
<a id="closebutton2" href="http://wastingtimegames.com" class="closebutton">Close</a><br />
<a id="closebutton3" href="http://theporscheguys.com" class="closebutton">Close</a>
<div id="dialog" title="Cancel"><p><span class="ui-icon ui-icon-alert" style="float:left; margin:0 7px 0 0;"></span> Are you sure you want to do that?</p><p>
If you are sure, click Yes.</p><p>If not click No.<p></div>

You can see the full demo code here. It is a text file for easy code viewing, but you can save it to your computer if you want to see it in action.

JSON Beats XML, or Ajaj vs Ajax

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Should the Ajax term be changed to Ajaj? Since Ajax stands for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML, but with more and more the web favoring JSON (especially in rich Ajax applications), should it now be called Ajaj and stand for Asynchronous JavaScript and JSON?

The reason that I bring this up is that James Clark one of the major contributors of XML is now saying that JSON is now the way of, at least, the "Cool" web. The post where James talks about this is called XML vs the Web.

Below is an excerpt from his post.

If other formats start to supplant XML, and they support these goals better than XML, I will be happy rather than worried.

From this perspective, my reaction to JSON is a combination of "Yay" and "Sigh".

It's "Yay", because for important use cases JSON is dramatically better than XML. In particular, JSON shines as a programming language-independent representation of typical programming language data structures. This is an incredibly important use case and it would be hard to overstate how appallingly bad XML is for this. The fundamental problem is the mismatch between programming language data structures and the XML element/attribute data model of elements. This leaves the developer with three choices, all unappetising:

* live with an inconvenient element/attribute representation of the data;
* descend into XML Schema hell in the company of your favourite data binding tool;
* write reams of code to convert the XML into a convenient data structure.

By contrast with JSON, especially with a dynamic programming language, you can get a reasonable in-memory representation just by calling a library function.

Norman argues that XML wasn't designed for this sort of thing. I don't think the history is quite as simple as that. There were many different individuals and organisations involved with XML 1.0, and they didn't all have the same vision for XML. The organisation that was perhaps most influential in terms of getting initial mainstream acceptance of XML was Microsoft, and Microsoft was certainly pushing XML as a representation for exactly this kind of data. Consider SOAP and XML Schema; a lot of the hype about XML and a lot of the specs built on top of XML for many years were focused on using XML for exactly this sort of thing.

You can read the full post here.

While I don't think that XML will ever totally go away (nor should it), I do think that in most Ajax applications that JSON makes more sense to use (with the biggest exception being if you just want to display the data). So go out there and start using Ajaj!

Video Tutorial of the Week - Ajax Progress Bar

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One common issue with Ajax applications is that the browsers progress bar does not show when data is being loaded in the background. The solution to this is to display a progress bar on the page where it makes sense to let the user know what is happening. So, this week's video tutorial will show you how to add a progress bar using ASP.NET(but the principles applies to other languages as well).


jQuery CSS and Effects - Video Tutorial of the Week

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This week's video tutorial is about creating effects using jQuery and CSS. jQuery is one of the best Ajax libraries available and if you want to learn more about it, then this tutorial will help.


Ajax Drag and Drop Shoping Cart Tutorial - Video

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This is the first of what will be a weekly tutorial video. This week's video is about creating a drag and drop shopping cart system. You can watch the video below.


Making it to the Ajaxonomy Home Page

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As you may know, Ajaxonomy is an open blog that allows for you to sign up for an account and write blog posts on our site. When you write a post all that we ask is that it relates to the theme of this site (so web development or technology related).

If you write a well written post about web development or a technology, there is a good chance that this post will get promoted to the front page.

What we will remove from our site is anything that looks like spam (we are currently, removing many spam articles from our site). So, make sure that you write something that a web developer will find interesting and we would love to get you on the front page of our large traffic site.

So, keep writing good articles and we look forward on promoting your post to the front page.

Visual WebGui web applications framework 6.4 beta 1 released w/ jQuery integration

The new Visual WebGui Web Applications Framework version which was released today offers upgraded performance, scalability and complete developer and designer freedom to design and customize Web 2.0 UIs. Visual WebGui 6.4 beta 1 incorporates about 1,000 complete features either added or fixed from 6.3, including increased customizability with the new control level designer, theme designer and jQuery integration. The new version also includes 4 out-of-the-box skins for simple personalization of the UI look and feel. The new version improves WinForms compatibility and provides a much comprehensive set of events with upgrades to the DataGrid and ListView.

6.4 also presents runtime enhancements with improved performance, memory consumption and CPU usage as well as scalability. The improvement in 6.4 reaches the compatibility areas with greater browser support which covers almost the entire spectrum of prominent browsers in the market.

Visual WebGui SDK with integration into Visual Studio 2010 will be available by the time that a 6.4 release version is out.

As announced before a revised documentation and a new task oriented kit will be soon available for Visual WebGui developers. The kit which will demonstrate all of Visual WebGui's controls, features and concepts will allow a quick live view of all of the platform's components as well as a deep dive for more advanced developers in their work.

Free beta downloads are available here.

Visual WebGui 6.3.11 & 6.4 Preview Released

Visual WebGui version 6.3.11 released after the R&D team had a major breakthrough with a designer issue.

In addition, Visual WebGui 6.4 Preview 4 was released. This version presents an important progress as Preview 4 is the last Preview version of the 6.4 version. Visual WebGui 6.4 allows to take advantage of incredibly fast application development without sacrificing the essential flexibility and customization of designing from scratch.

"The Visual WebGui 6.4 preview version is another step towards simplifying and commoditizing complex Ajax web development . The ease of developing with Visual WebGui combined with the new efficient interface between developers and designers gives Visual WebGui an unparalleled advantage over other RIA development platforms. The market loves our solution and rewards us in its download and adoption rate," said Navot Peled, CEO and founder of Gizmox.

The release version of 6.4 is expected before the end of 2009.

Download Free Preview:
http://www.visualwebgui.com/tabid/639/Default.aspx

Free Downloads Here.

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